1. Ms. Bardugo, I loved your first books, but I was terribly disappointed to see you give in to political correctness in Ruin & Rising. You had a great story and then you ruined it with unnecessary lesbianism. Authors don't need to make statements, they just need to write good books. I hope you'll remember that in the future.

    lbardugo:

    I was really tempted to ignore this because I don’t believe in giving anon wangs a platform, but the term “unnecessary lesbianism” made me laugh so hard that I caved.

    Authors can write good books and make statements. I’m going to make some statements now. (Get ready.)

    Queer people and queer relationships aren’t less necessary to narrative than cishet people or relationships. In fact, given the lovely emails and messages I’ve received about Tamar and Nadia (and given the existence of anon wangs like you), I’d say making queer relationships visible in young adult fiction is an excellent—and yes, necessary—idea.

    I do agree that story trumps statement or we’d all just write angry pamphlets, but queer people exist both in my world and the world of the Grisha trilogy. I don’t see how including them in my work is making a statement unless that statement is “I won’t willfully ignore or exclude people in order to make a few anon wangs happy.” If that’s the statement I’m making, I’m totally down with it.

    Also, I’m going to take this moment to shout out Malinda Lo, Laura Lam, Alex London, David Levithan, Emily Danforth, Emma Trevayne, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and Cassandra Clare, and to link to Malinda’s 2013 guide to LGBT in YA.  Because why just give attention to bigots when you can talk about awesome books and authors instead?

  2. Clone Club + tumblr (insp.)

    (Source: tinytmas, via normanbuckley)

  3. (Source: korrastyle, via themarysue)

  4. audreyii-fic:

    "Ghostbusters" starring Mindy Kaling, America Ferrera, Aubrey Plaza, and Rebel Wilson

    (via themarysue)

  5. babiesgettingrabies:

    thishassomethingtodowithpotter:

    Taystee explaining Outlander’s plot

    would read Taystee’s bookblog

    (via longstoryshorter)

  6. arathesane:

    dangerhamster:

    god bless you all

    (Source: sandandglass, via rainbowrowell)

  7. Marty’s outfit: Back to the Future.

    (via ohheygrace)

  8. (Source: zavimbi, via themarysue)

  9. queerpunkhamlet:

recoveringsjw:

sidneyia:

god-senpai:

queerpunkhamlet:

cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

"WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

It’s not my job to educate you, teacher. 

I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.
this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes
bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake
    High Res

    queerpunkhamlet:

    recoveringsjw:

    sidneyia:

    god-senpai:

    queerpunkhamlet:

    cis people aren’t allowed to edit my papers anymore

    "WHAAATT? I HAVE TO EXPLAIN MY WORK??? IN MY OWN PAPER??? WHAT THE FUUUCK??"

    It’s not my job to educate you, teacher.

    I’m betting one hundred bucks that this is a comment about a really badly written essay and not someone being actively transphobic.

    well, you’re about to owe me one hundred bucks.

    1. this is not the first time i mentioned privilege in the paper. or cisgender. this paper was written on my personal experiences with being trans, and the difficulties i’ve faced because of it, and the difficulties that cisgender people with otherwise comparable lives have not faced.
    2. the terms privilege and cisgender had both been thoroughly elaborated on in this paper.
    3. this paper was written for a women’s studies class, on gender analysis, in which both privilege and cisgender privilege in particular had been explained, elaborated upon, and discussed by the professor.
    4. the comment was not by the professor, it was by a cis classmate during a peer review.
    5. the words cisgender and privilege are both in scare quotes (in case you can’t google that or don’t know what it means or want to deny their existence, scare quotes is when you put a word or phrase in quotation marks to make it seem less real — the textual version of sarcastically making air quotes with your fingers)
    6. another edit, by the same editor, involved asking me what my birth name was. i’m sure you don’t need to be told that that’s transphobic.
    7. i spoke to the professor about this edit, and he agreed with me that the comment (and the way it was phrased) was out of line. in fact, he thought it was so out of line that he led a workshop for the class on how not to be disrespectful assholes to trans people (say, by asking for their birth name, or telling them they’re wrong or oversensitive about transphobia).
    8. i got a 99% on the essay — WITHOUT changing anything the edit asked for.
    9. the professor liked my essay so much that he asked to keep it as an EXAMPLE for future classes

    bonus: if your reaction to seeing gross transphobic things is “well it’s probably the trans person’s fault”, then you’re gross and transphobic and i hope you don’t know any trans people IRL for their sake

    (via iftheresawill)

  10. (Source: gilbertsalvator)